Prince Albert Volleyball Club (PAVC)
© PAVC Club Volleyball Prince Albert Saskatchewan

History

Smashing Bananas is about learning to play and compete at a higher level

The Prince Albert Volleyball Club Smashing Bananas was founded by Don

Laing  and Terry Springett in January 1996 as an attempt to  increase the

level of play of boys volleyball in Prince Albert. Initially, the club was very

small in size only offering 3 teams a season Bantam (14U), Midget (16U) and

Juvenile (18U). As the level of play has increased over the years in the Prince

Albert area, the number of athletes and number of teams has also

increased. in 2010, we had a record 6 teams registered in the club!

 

The Smashing Bananas have been successful at Provincial and National

Competitions over the years. Teams regularly attend Volleyball Canada

National Championships are are quite successful despite our community's

small size compared to the larger centers that we compete against during

competition. The top finishes of our club at National Championships are

indicated below.

 

1996 - Midget Team (16U) - 7th place at Midget Western Canadian

Championships in Victoria, B.C.

1997- Midget Team (16U)  - Gold Medal at Midget Western Canadian

Championships in Brandon, MB

1998 - Juvenile Team (18U) - 6th Place at Juvenile Nationals in Vancouver, B.C.

1999 - Juvenile Team (18U) - 6th Place at Juvenile Nationals in St. Johns' , NL

2000 - Midget Team (16U) - 7th Place at Midget Western Canadian Open in

Calgary, AB

2001 - Midget Team (16U) - Silver Medal at Midget Western Canadian Open in

Calgary, AB

2003 - Midget Team (16U) - Bronze Medal at Midget Western Canadian Open

in Calgary, AB

2004 - Midget Team (16U) - 5th Place at Midget Western Canadian Open in

Calgary, AB

2007 - 14U Boys -5th Place at 14U  Western Canadian Open in Saskatoon, SK

 

When boys' volleyball was a sport at the Saskatchewan Winter Games, they

were Gold medalists 3 times:n 1998 in Nipawin, 2002 in Humboldt, and 2006

in Melfort.

 

 2006 Sask Winter Games Champions!

 Bananas Fun

16U Provincial Gold 2009

 

The Smashing Bananas Volleyball program has been instrumental in

successfully developing athletes for Saskatchewan Provincial Teams and

Canadian National Teams for the past 15 years.  Many of these players have

gone on to compete with CCAA and CIS teams. The PAVC alumni who have

played CCAA and CIS volleyball are:

 

Adam Ens - University of Saskatchewan Huskies (1999-2004) Dan Simair -

University of Saskatchewan Huskies(1999-2001) Trent Mason- Keyano

College (1999-2001)

Dennis Dalziel - Lethbridge College (1999-2001)

Adam Buettner - S.A.I.T. (2000-2001)

Stephan Chelsom University of Saskatchewan Huskies

(2003-2004)

Adam Pearson - University of Saskatchewan Huskies

(2003-2004)

Chris Simair - University of Saskatchewan Huskies

(2003-2004)

Julien Yeo - University of Saskatchewan Huskies (2003-2005)

Dan Quintal -University of Saskatchewan Huskies (2004-2010)

Alwyn Piche - Keyano College (2006-2009) and University of Saskatchewan

Huskies (2009-2010)

Chris Knoop - University or Regina Cougars (2004-2009) Max Oleksinski -

University of Saskatchewan Huskies

(2007-2009)

Matt Skotheim - University of Saskatchewan Huskies (2007-2009, and 2010-

present)

Braden McLean - University of Saskatchewan Huskies

(2009-present)

Adam Wendt - University of Saskatchewan Huskies

(2010-present)

Dane Sanderson - University or Regina Cougars (2010-present)

Stephen Korol - Keyano College (2010 - present)

 

Two former Bananas' have represented Canada in international volleyball

competition.

 

In 1998, Ryan Pocha was a setter with the Youth National Team.  In 2005,

Alwyn Piche was on the Youth National Team that competed at the Under 19

World Championships in Algeria.

 

 

William Morgan 1870 - 1942

From Mary Bellis & Scott Hammon,

William Morgan invented volleyball in 1895 at the Holyoke, Massachusetts,

YMCA (Young Men's Christian Association) where he served as Director of

Physical Education. Morgan originally called his new game of Volleyball,

Mintonette. The name Volleyball came about after a demonstration game of

the sport, when spectators commented that the game involved a lot of

"volleying" and the game was later renamed “Volleyball”.

William Morgan was born in the state of New York and studied at Springfield

College, Massachusetts. Ironically at Springfield, Morgan met James

Naismith who invented basketball in 1891. Morgan was motivated by

Naismith's game of basketball designed for younger students to invent a

game suitable for the older members of the YMCA. William Morgan's basis

for the new game of Volleyball was the then popular and similar German

game of Faustball. Volleyball was first played with a tennis net raised to a

height of 6 and 1/2 feet off the floor and combined many of the rules of

baseball, tennis, handball and basketball.

Can you believe that during the birth of volleyball, the teams could have any

number of players? Each game was played for nine endings. There was no

limit to the number of hits on each side. There were quite a few crazy rules.

This quickly changed as the sport gained in popularity. In 1890 the first ball

designed for volleyball emerged and the net was raised a foot. In fact it was

not until 1916 that through a series of rule changes, that a rule set that

resembles today's emerged.

It was also in 1916 that we saw one of the most exciting aspects of the game

emerge, the spike. The spike, or overhand attack, was developed in the

Philippines and brought about a radical new change to the game, offense.

The Philippines developed an offensive strategy that propelled a ball on a

high trajectory (set) for which another player would jump and strike the ball

down (spike).

Riding on this new offensive excitement, soon volleyball became popular

and tournaments were organized in YMCAs around the United States.

Volleyball spread around the world and eventually a world governing body,

the Federation for International Volleyball (FIVB) was established in 1947.

Today Volleyball is the second most popular sport in the world (behind

soccer). From its beginnings more than 110 years ago it has spread to every

corner of the world and the number of players is nearing one billion. No one

knows exactly why volleyball has such a huge following but one thing is for

certain: since its early beginnings, volleyball has gone through some

dramatic changes. Changes made for the love of the game and its expansion

as a popular sport.

Volleyball is a sport in transition. With the increasing competition between

sports for  television time, sponsorship money and expansion, millions of

players, fans and coaches are each doing all they can for the love of the

volleyball.

Beach Volleyball

From Dawn Henthorn,

Although beach volleyball was first played in the 1920s in the United States,

it didn't become a competitive sport in California until 1947. Beach

volleyball has grown today in popularity that rivals its indoor counterpart.

The first world championships were held in 1976 and, while there has never

been a successful professional indoor volleyball tour in the U.S., in 1983 the

U.S. saw its first professional beach volleyball league, the Association of

Volleyball Professionals. Beach volleyball gained its highest moment when it

was added as an official sport in the 1996 Olympics.

 

Rules:

Beach volleyball follows the basic rules of indoor volleyball, except it is

played on sand with two players on a side. Some versions use three, four, or

six players on a team. The teams may be all male, all female, or coed

(mixed). Rules vary slightly for each version.

Court:

The court is a rectangular area 59 feet (18 meters) long and 29-1/2 feet (9

meters) wide. A surrounding free zone must be a least 9 feet 10 inches (3

meters) wide.

The court boundary lines are usually marked by flat tape or ropes.

Sometimes, the lines are drawn in the sand.

Net:

The net is about 8 feet (2.4 meters) high for men and slightly lower for

women.

Ball:

The ball is similar to the one used in indoor volleyball (slightly heavier).

Game:

Games may last for 21 or 15 points. A match may consist of one game or go

to the first team to win two games.

Don Lang 
       Terry Springett
PAVC

History

Smashing Bananas is about

learning to play and

compete at a higher level

The Prince Albert Volleyball

Club Smashing Bananas

was founded by Don Laing 

and Terry Springett in

January 1996 as an attempt

to  increase the level of

play of boys volleyball in

Prince Albert. Initially, the

club was very small in size

only offering 3 teams a

season Bantam (14U),

Midget (16U) and Juvenile

(18U). As the level of play

has increased over the

years in the Prince Albert

area, the number of

athletes and number of

teams has also increased.

in 2010, we had a record 6

teams registered in the

club!

 

The Smashing Bananas

have been successful at

Provincial and National

Competitions over the

years. Teams regularly

attend Volleyball Canada

National Championships

are are quite successful

despite our community's

small size compared to the

larger centers that we

compete against during

competition. The top

finishes of our club at

National Championships

are indicated below.

 

1996 - Midget Team (16U) -

7th place at Midget

Western Canadian

Championships in Victoria,

B.C.

1997- Midget Team (16U)  -

Gold Medal at Midget

Western Canadian

Championships in Brandon,

MB

1998 - Juvenile Team (18U) -

6th Place at Juvenile

Nationals in Vancouver,

B.C.

1999 - Juvenile Team (18U) -

6th Place at Juvenile

Nationals in St. Johns' , NL

2000 - Midget Team (16U) -

7th Place at Midget

Western Canadian Open in

Calgary, AB

2001 - Midget Team (16U) -

Silver Medal at Midget

Western Canadian Open in

Calgary, AB

2003 - Midget Team (16U) -

Bronze Medal at Midget

Western Canadian Open in

Calgary, AB

2004 - Midget Team (16U) -

5th Place at Midget

Western Canadian Open in

Calgary, AB

2007 - 14U Boys -5th Place

at 14U  Western Canadian

Open in Saskatoon, SK

 

When boys' volleyball was

a sport at the

Saskatchewan Winter

Games, they were Gold

medalists 3 times:n 1998 in

Nipawin, 2002 in

Humboldt, and 2006 in

Melfort.

 

 2006 Sask Winter Games

Champions!

 Bananas Fun

16U Provincial Gold 2009

 

The Smashing Bananas

Volleyball program has

been instrumental in

successfully developing

athletes for Saskatchewan

Provincial Teams and

Canadian National Teams

for the past 15 years. 

Many of these players have

gone on to compete with

CCAA and CIS teams. The

PAVC alumni who have

played CCAA and CIS

volleyball are:

 

Adam Ens - University of

Saskatchewan Huskies

(1999-2004) Dan Simair -

University of

Saskatchewan

Huskies(1999-2001) Trent

Mason- Keyano College

(1999-2001)

Dennis Dalziel - Lethbridge

College (1999-2001)

Adam Buettner - S.A.I.T.

(2000-2001)

Stephan Chelsom

University of

Saskatchewan Huskies

(2003-2004)

Adam Pearson - University

of Saskatchewan Huskies

(2003-2004)

Chris Simair - University of

Saskatchewan Huskies

(2003-2004)

Julien Yeo - University of

Saskatchewan Huskies

(2003-2005)

Dan Quintal -University of

Saskatchewan Huskies

(2004-2010)

Alwyn Piche - Keyano

College (2006-2009) and

University of

Saskatchewan Huskies

(2009-2010)

Chris Knoop - University or

Regina Cougars (2004-2009)

Max Oleksinski - University

of Saskatchewan Huskies

(2007-2009)

Matt Skotheim - University

of Saskatchewan Huskies

(2007-2009, and 2010-

present)

Braden McLean - University

of Saskatchewan Huskies

(2009-present)

Adam Wendt - University of

Saskatchewan Huskies

(2010-present)

Dane Sanderson -

University or Regina

Cougars (2010-present)

Stephen Korol - Keyano

College (2010 - present)

 

Two former Bananas' have

represented Canada in

international volleyball

competition.

 

In 1998, Ryan Pocha was a

setter with the Youth

National Team.  In 2005,

Alwyn Piche was on the

Youth National Team that

competed at the Under 19

World Championships in

Algeria.

 

 

William Morgan 1870 - 1942

From Mary Bellis & Scott

Hammon,

William Morgan invented

volleyball in 1895 at the

Holyoke, Massachusetts,

YMCA (Young Men's

Christian Association)

where he served as

Director of Physical

Education. Morgan

originally called his new

game of Volleyball,

Mintonette. The name

Volleyball came about

after a demonstration

game of the sport, when

spectators commented

that the game involved a

lot of "volleying" and the

game was later renamed

“Volleyball”.

William Morgan was born

in the state of New York

and studied at Springfield

College, Massachusetts.

Ironically at Springfield,

Morgan met James

Naismith who invented

basketball in 1891. Morgan

was motivated by

Naismith's game of

basketball designed for

younger students to invent

a game suitable for the

older members of the

YMCA. William Morgan's

basis for the new game of

Volleyball was the then

popular and similar

German game of Faustball.

Volleyball was first played

with a tennis net raised to

a height of 6 and 1/2 feet

off the floor and combined

many of the rules of

baseball, tennis, handball

and basketball.

Can you believe that

during the birth of

volleyball, the teams could

have any number of

players? Each game was

played for nine endings.

There was no limit to the

number of hits on each

side. There were quite a

few crazy rules. This

quickly changed as the

sport gained in popularity.

In 1890 the first ball

designed for volleyball

emerged and the net was

raised a foot. In fact it was

not until 1916 that through

a series of rule changes,

that a rule set that

resembles today's

emerged.

It was also in 1916 that we

saw one of the most

exciting aspects of the

game emerge, the spike.

The spike, or overhand

attack, was developed in

the Philippines and

brought about a radical

new change to the game,

offense. The Philippines

developed an offensive

strategy that propelled a

ball on a high trajectory

(set) for which another

player would jump and

strike the ball down

(spike).

Riding on this new

offensive excitement, soon

volleyball became popular

and tournaments were

organized in YMCAs around

the United States.

Volleyball spread around

the world and eventually a

world governing body, the

Federation for

International Volleyball

(FIVB) was established in

1947.

Today Volleyball is the

second most popular sport

in the world (behind

soccer). From its

beginnings more than 110

years ago it has spread to

every corner of the world

and the number of players

is nearing one billion. No

one knows exactly why

volleyball has such a huge

following but one thing is

for certain: since its early

beginnings, volleyball has

gone through some

dramatic changes. Changes

made for the love of the

game and its expansion as

a popular sport.

Volleyball is a sport in

transition. With the

increasing competition

between sports for 

television time,

sponsorship money and

expansion, millions of

players, fans and coaches

are each doing all they can

for the love of the

volleyball.

Beach Volleyball

From Dawn Henthorn,

Although beach volleyball

was first played in the

1920s in the United States,

it didn't become a

competitive sport in

California until 1947. Beach

volleyball has grown today

in popularity that rivals its

indoor counterpart. The

first world championships

were held in 1976 and,

while there has never been

a successful professional

indoor volleyball tour in

the U.S., in 1983 the U.S.

saw its first professional

beach volleyball league,

the Association of

Volleyball Professionals.

Beach volleyball gained its

highest moment when it

was added as an official

sport in the 1996 Olympics.

 

Rules:

Beach volleyball follows

the basic rules of indoor

volleyball, except it is

played on sand with two

players on a side. Some

versions use three, four, or

six players on a team. The

teams may be all male, all

female, or coed (mixed).

Rules vary slightly for each

version.

Court:

The court is a rectangular

area 59 feet (18 meters)

long and 29-1/2 feet (9

meters) wide. A

surrounding free zone

must be a least 9 feet 10

inches (3 meters) wide.

The court boundary lines

are usually marked by flat

tape or ropes. Sometimes,

the lines are drawn in the

sand.

Net:

The net is about 8 feet (2.4

meters) high for men and

slightly lower for women.

Ball:

The ball is similar to the

one used in indoor

volleyball (slightly heavier).

Game:

Games may last for 21 or

15 points. A match may

consist of one game or go

to the first team to win

two games.