Prince Albert Volleyball Club (PAVC)
© PAVC Club Volleyball Prince Albert Saskatchewan
To stay hydrated, you need about 2 to 3 L (9 to 12 cups) of fluids every day. Being active increases your needs due to the fluids you lose through sweat.   Depending on the sport or exercise you do, its intensity, the weather, and your individual sweat rate, you could lose anywhere from 0.3 to 2.4 L (about 1¼ to 10 cups) of sweat per hour. It’s easy to see how exercising in hot weather can lead to large sweat losses, but it can also happen in cold-weather sports like hockey and skiing and even in water sports like swimming. If you don’t drink enough to replace your sweat losses, you can become dehydrated.  This can leave you overheated, tired and hurt your performance. Signs of dehydration are thirst, dizziness, headache, and muscle cramps. Severe dehydration can increase the risk for heat illness and heat stroke. Steps you can take   Stay Hydrated Drink throughout the day.  Choose water most of the time, but 100% fruit juice, milk, tea, coffee, and sports drinks also provide fluids. Check the colour of your urine.  Plenty of pale yellow (e.g. lemonade colour) urine is a sign you are well hydrated.  A small amount of dark yellow (e.g. apple juice colour) urine could mean that you are dehydrated. Drink enough fluids during exercise. To know if you are drinking enough to replace fluid losses, weigh yourself just before and right after you exercise.  Be sure to empty your bladder and remove sweaty clothing before weighing.  If you lose more than 2% of your body weight during exercise, it means that you need to drink more. For example, a 70 kg (154 lb) person that loses more than 1.4 kg (3 lb) during exercise is not drinking enough. Weight loss right after exercise is water loss, not fat loss.  Fat loss occurs slowly over days, weeks and months.  Fluids before, during, and after exercise
PAVC

Players Nutrition

To stay hydrated, you need about 2 to 3 L (9 to 12 cups) of fluids every day. Being active increases your needs due to the fluids you lose through sweat.   Depending on the sport or exercise you do, its intensity, the weather, and your individual sweat rate, you could lose anywhere from 0.3 to 2.4 L (about 1¼ to 10 cups) of sweat per hour. It’s easy to see how exercising in hot weather can lead to large sweat losses, but it can also happen in cold-weather sports like hockey and skiing and even in water sports like swimming. If you don’t drink enough to replace your sweat losses, you can become dehydrated.  This can leave you overheated, tired and hurt your performance. Signs of dehydration are thirst, dizziness, headache, and muscle cramps. Severe dehydration can increase the risk for heat illness and heat stroke. Steps you can take   Stay Hydrated Drink throughout the day.  Choose water most of the time, but 100% fruit juice, milk, tea, coffee, and sports drinks also provide fluids. Check the colour of your urine.  Plenty of pale yellow (e.g. lemonade colour) urine is a sign you are well hydrated.  A small amount of dark yellow (e.g. apple juice colour) urine could mean that you are dehydrated. Drink enough fluids during exercise. To know if you are drinking enough to replace fluid losses, weigh yourself just before and right after you exercise.  Be sure to empty your bladder and remove sweaty clothing before weighing.  If you lose more than 2% of your body weight during exercise, it means that you need to drink more. For example, a 70 kg (154 lb) person that loses more than 1.4 kg (3 lb) during exercise is not drinking enough. Weight loss right after exercise is water loss, not fat loss.  Fat loss occurs slowly over days, weeks and months.  Fluids before, during, and after exercise